Business Desk

Olivia Girard is the pastry chef behind The Dinersaur, and she makes the baked goods at local spots like Futuro Coffee, First Place Coffee and Restaurant Progress, but here’s the thing: she doesn’t really like sweets.
Johnson & Johnson Ordered To Pay $2 Million To AZ
Johnson & Johnson has been ordered to pay more than $2 million to Arizona for misleading claims about the safety and effectiveness of its transvaginal mesh products. Attorney General Mark Brnovich announced that Ethicon Inc. and its parent company, Johnson & Johnson, have both agreed to pay about $117 million in penalties.
Oct. 18, 2019
AZ Auditor General Criticizes Lack Of ABOR Oversight
A new report from the Arizona auditor general has some pretty critical words for the body that governs our state’s public universities.
Oct. 18, 2019
AZ Bird Species Are Under Threat From Climate Change
Nearly half of Arizona’s bird species are vulnerable to one model of climate change according to a new analysis from the Audubon Society, which also found two-thirds of North American bird species are also threatened by climate change.
Oct. 18, 2019
Mexico’s Controversial Union Leader Of Pemex Steps Down
The leader of one of Mexico’s largest and most powerful unions has just stepped down, as he faces an investigation for money laundering. His resignation could have an effect in the U.S.
Oct. 17, 2019
Apps May Replace Hotel Check-In Desks, Room Keys
Hospitality is a big industry in Arizona, and some innovative changes could be coming to hotels in the Phoenix metro area.
Oct. 17, 2019
Points Of View: Ratifying The USMCA
Trade between Canada, Mexico and the U.S. has become an integral part of our economy in Arizona. Now, pressure is rising for Congress to ratify a new deal between the three countries: the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement, known better as the USMCA or the new NAFTA.
Oct. 17, 2019
50 Years Of El Metro: Secrets Of The Unusual Transportation System
Mexico City’s subway is turning 50. It's one of the largest in the world — and one of the most peculiar ones. In this series, we’ll explore the Metro's secrets and the lessons it could bring to U.S. cities like Phoenix, where rail systems are small or non-existent.
Oct. 17, 2019
Report: Water Replenishment Program Faces Uncertainty
It has allowed developers to grow subdivisions since the early 1990s. A key water management tool that enables housing development in central Arizona does not have a rosy future. That’s a key finding of a new report from Arizona State University.
Oct. 17, 2019
Phoenix Raises Uber, Lyft Fees At Sky Harbor Airport
Uber and Lyft now pay a $2.66 fee when they pick passengers at Sky Harbor Airport terminals. The Phoenix City Council voted for a proposal from Sky Harbor officials to increase the fee to $4 in 2020, and gradually to $5 in 2024.
Oct. 16, 2019
Why More Seniors Are Becoming Homeless
The number of older Arizonans who are becoming homeless for the first time is on the rise. And once a person becomes homeless, it can take up to two years to get into affordable housing.
Oct. 16, 2019
What Responsibility Does News Have In Our Polarized Time?
What responsibility do networks, newspapers and social media companies have to not only present facts, but also help viewers, listeners and readers understand what’s going on within our national institutions?
Oct. 16, 2019
Number Of People In U.S. Households Is Expected To Go Up
The number of people in households in the United States has been on the decline pretty much since its founding, but this decade is expected to be the first in which that longtime trend reverses.
Oct. 16, 2019
Arizona Nonprofits Prepare For End Of APS Shut-Off Moratorium
As a result of the Corporation Commission-imposed moratorium on power shut-offs, APS says around 88,000 ratepayers owe more than $30 million. For many of those customers, it’ll still be a challenge to pay their bills even after the break.
Oct. 16, 2019
Mine Workers Strike Continues; Contract Negotiations At A Standstill
Some Arizona mine workers walked off the job earlier this week after voting to strike against unfair labor practices. Workers in Arizona and Texas chose not to accept a recent offer from the Tucson-based copper producer Asarco.
Oct. 16, 2019
Grand Canyon Closes Most Of North Rim Preps For Winter
Grand Canyon National Park is reducing its services Wednesday as it prepares for winter. The North Rim will be closing until mid-May.
Oct. 16, 2019
Lawmaker: Ducey Must Lead On Pinal County Water Crisis
Prescott Republican Rep. Noel Campbell is at odds with other lawmakers and the executive branch when it comes to a plan to solve a water crisis in the Pinal County region.
Oct. 15, 2019
Pinal Farmers Cry Out Against Developments That Pull Water
Pinal County ranks first in the state for cotton, barley and livestock production, according to the Arizona Farm Bureau, among other notable products, but water supplies are also on demand from new developments in the area, and farmers who have held claims for decades are crying foul.
Oct. 15, 2019
Ripples Felt As The Navajo Generating Station Closes
The Navajo Generating Station is shutting down, creating a ripple effect across the region, from the families left searching for jobs to the Grand Canyon where its absence may mean improvements to air quality. Utility reporter Ryan Randazzo has been covering the generating station and what will be left in its wake.
Oct. 15, 2019
Report Aims To Close Gap In Data On Connectivity In Indian Country
Nearly 20% of Native Americans living on reservations do not have any internet access at home, and more than a third rely on their cellphones to get online. Those are among the findings of a new report assessing tribal technology.
Oct. 15, 2019
Some Arizona Copper Mine Workers Walk Off Job
Some Arizona mine workers walked off the job Monday. This comes after they voted overwhelmingly to strike against unfair labor practices. About 2,000 hourly workers at five Asarco locations in Arizona and Texas voted for the strike on Friday, according to the United Steelworkers Union.
Oct. 15, 2019