Science News

the pulse logo
With 70,000 people, over a thousand open bars, and hundreds of giant fires, the annual Burning Man gathering sounds like a recipe for a mess. But guess how many garbage cans are provided? Zero.
Oct. 10, 2017
Chuckwalla
The Arizona Game and Fish Department is working with the Department of Transportation to safeguard species in the path of the Loop 202 South Mountain Freeway – including a large lizard found throughout the desert southwest.
Oct. 10, 2017
A new survey finds a disconnect between people’s perception of their own health and the reality of it.
Oct. 9, 2017
Baby
Every week, Beth Nobles visits Dana D’Ambrosio and her newborn daughter, Anastasia, at her home to check her weight and height, and to check in on her mom. D’Ambrosio is enrolled in the Maricopa County Department of Health’s Nurse-Family Partnership, and Nobles is a nurse who has been visiting her every week for months.
Oct. 9, 2017
Pills
Friday brought news of the birth control mandate rollback, but federal officials have been cutting provisions and budgets for the Affordable Care Act for some time. With us for a few minutes to talk about that is James Hodge, ASU director of the Center for Public Health Law and Policy.
Oct. 9, 2017
Exploding Dots
Math is not usually something you think about when you log on to social media. But one math educator is trying to change that notion for teachers and students.
Oct. 9, 2017
 flooding irrigation
The compiled data could eventually be used to help manage and predict groundwater loss in the future.
Oct. 9, 2017
The federal government awarded Gallup, New Mexico $1.5 million for its detox center, which borders the Navajo Nation.
Oct. 9, 2017
health
Stroke is on the rise and hitting people at a younger age than ever before.
Oct. 9, 2017
This year’s Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to three men, but the detection of gravitational waves was the work of a thousand scientists and students – 10 of them from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott.
Oct. 9, 2017
Benchmark Electronics estimates it will add about 500 jobs to the Valley in the next five years and break ground on its new headquarters before the end of the year.
Oct. 7, 2017
the state of aging logo
Arizona has long been a destination for older Americans with its pristine retirement communities. But aging in America isn’t what it used to be. It’s expensive and sometimes isolating. This series aims to explore the reality of an aging society. The aging issue isn’t going away — so let's talk about it.
Oct. 7, 2017
Saguaro National Park near Tucson wants the public’s help to find out who vandalized a saguaro cactus, which appeared to have been shot multiple times. The incident carries a steep penalty with a fine of up to $5,000, and even jail time.
Oct. 6, 2017
Headache
Arizona State University's psychology department plans to expand a study targeting women dealing with high levels of stress.
Oct. 6, 2017
What we know as the cloud can take many forms -- even a fake palm tree.
Oct. 6, 2017
centers for disease control cdc
Public health officials say an ongoing outbreak of Hepatitis A that has sickened hundreds in Southern California also made its way to Arizona earlier this year.
Oct. 5, 2017
When you hear the name ‘the Tutu Project,’ you might think it’s something to do with the ballet. But for photographer Bob Carey, wearing a pink tutu is more about vulnerability.
Oct. 5, 2017
Phoenix’s Desert Botanical Garden is known, obviously, for its plants. But it’s been undergoing a bit of a makeover, in terms of its buildings. It’s part of the garden’s new horticultural center, and has been in the works for a few years; the first phase opened earlier this year.
Oct. 5, 2017
Silicon Valley and some of its most identifiable companies and leaders have hit the highest highs in high-tech. But elected officials are worried about their growing power, which some have labeled monopolistic.
Oct. 5, 2017
In a check of regional news, the El Capitan monolith in Yosemite National Park experienced two massive rockfalls last week, one of which claimed the life of a British tourist at the base of the cliff. One of the pieces of rock that sheared off was described as “as big as an apartment building."
Oct. 4, 2017

Pages